The Optical Science Laboratory (OSL) at Northeastern University

Welcome to the Optical Science Laboratory (OSL) at Northeastern University. Led by Associate Professor and author of Optics for Engineers, Charles DiMarzio, the OSL is one of the laboratories affiliated with Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, CenSSIS, and the Center for Subsurface Sensing and Imaging Systems, at Northeastern University. The Center is an NSF Engineering Research Center, working toward a unified approach to subsurface imaging tasks. The OSL is particularly interested in those imaging techniques which involve optics (especially coherent detection), multi-modal imaging where light is used in combination with another type of wave such as microwave or ultrasound, and hyperspectral imaging. Our applications include biological and medical imaging, landmine detection, and remote sensing of the environment. OSL's goals are to provide a facility for advanced research in these areas in order to address the needs of research sponsors, and to train the next generation of researchers for industry, academia, and the government.

The Optical Science Laboratory is distributed across four areas in the Egan Research Center. The main facility is in Room 334, consisting of a 700-square-foot laboratory with sink and fume hood, a 300-square-foot dark laboratory, desk space for graduate students and a small electronics shop.

Across the hall in Room 352 is BioBED, the biological testbed of the Center for Subsurface Sensing and Imaging Systems. One section (600 square feet) of this facility is a biology laboratory housing an incubator, sink, dissecting scope, and quadrature tomographic microscope. The other laboratory section (300 square feet) is the home of the Keck Three-Dimensional Fusion Microscope. Additional space includes desks for graduate students and a meeting room with internet conferencing facilities.

Our rooftop test facility includes a platform for remote sensing experiments, with electrical power, voice, and data lines available.

The site has lines of sight to the horizon for over 270 degrees of azimuth. It also includes a heated storage and work area in room 610 of the Egan Research Center, so that we may store large research instruments and make minor repairs.